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I’ve Been Vaccinated. Now what?


Many people aged 65 and over have now received two doses of the vaccine. “Now what”? is probably the question on their mind. In answering that important question, you might keep the following points in mind:

  • Full vaccine effectiveness occurs two weeks after the second shot.

  • The two vaccines that have been given, Pfizer and Moderna, are up to 95% effective when you are fully immunized (meaning, two weeks after your second dose.) This means that there is a 5% chance that one can still suffer serious illness if one is infected with COVID19.

  • According to the CDC, “We also don’t yet know whether getting a COVID-19 vaccine will prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to other people, even if you don’t get sick yourself.” So, it is important to keep following the safety protocols: wear a mask over your mouth and nose; stay physically distant from others; avoid crows and poorly ventilated spaces; and wash your hands often.


What is Herd Immunity?


According to a Harvard report, herd immunity is estimated when 90% of the population is immune due to infection or vaccination. Once this threshold is reached, it’s difficult for the disease to spread. As the authors point out, “As of now, we are nowhere close to the numbers needed to achieve herd immunity.” So, it’s important that we all keep following the CDC safety guidelines.


Now that I'm Vaccinated, what can I do?


Want to know more about what someone that is vaccinated can do? Here’s an informative albeit long article from The Atlantic. The short version is perhaps best captured with this one quote from the article: “There is one principle—if not a black-and-white rule—that can help both the vaccinated and the unvaccinated navigate our once again unfamiliar world: When deciding what you can and can’t do, you should think less about your own vaccination status, and more about whether your neighbors, family, grocery clerks, delivery drivers, and friends are still vulnerable to the virus.” Therefore, it’s vitally important for each of us to continue following the CDC protocols outlined in the last bullet above.


When deciding what you can and can’t do, you should think less about your own vaccination status, and more about whether your neighbors, family, grocery clerks, delivery drivers, and friends are still vulnerable to the virus.”

Haven’t gotten the vaccine yet? Here’s what to do to prepare. Reported side effects from the vaccine vary from slightly from sore arms to flu-like symptoms for a day or so. As a precaution, stock up on easy to prepare meals before your vaccine appointment and ask a loved one or Cleveland & Woodley Park Village volunteer to check on you for a few days after you’ve received your first and second doses. You can learn more about what to expect after getting the COVID shot here.

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